When the Spencer stanzas are included, the first line and title are frequently altered to "Almighty Father..." and the last line of the fourth stanza to "Glad praise from air and land and sea" (as for example in Hymnal 1940 #513, where Spencer is uncredited). For those we love so far away. The first three stanzas of this hymn appeal to the Trinity with Scripture passages where each Person controlled the sea, while the final stanza summarizes the hymn and promises continued praise “from land and sea.”. And give them light and life and peace. Thus, evermore shall rise to Thee Lord, stand beside the men who build, Abide with Me Oh, Watchful Father who dost keep Nearer My God to Thee Guide those who navigate on high The setting here is by John B. Dykes … We dedicate this ship to thee. O hear us when we cry to Thee  This hymn was popularised by the Royal Navy and the United States Navy in the late 19th century, and alterations of it were soon adopted by many branches of the armed services in the United Kingdom and the United States. It is a fitting name for a tune associated with a text about safety on the seas. Although this familiar tune is not hard to sing, congregation members may be more familiar with hearing instrumental versions, such as are found in “All Nature Sings” for piano with the melody in varying registers, or “Eternal Father, Strong to Save” a piano and organ duet that begins in a quiet, prayerful mood but swells to a majestic climax. Please consider white-listing Hymnary.org or, All Nature Sings (Piano hymn settings th…, Eternal Father, strong to save, Whose arm hath bound the restless wave, African Methodist Episcopal Church Hymnal #316, Anglican Hymns Old and New (Rev. In darkening storms or sunlight fair; O Christ, whose voice the waters heard and hushed their raging at thy word, who walkedst on the foaming deep, Examples fair on land and sea. The original chant melody associated with this text [i.e., "Eternal Father, strong to save"] is found in most hymnals of denominations where chant has played a role, including the Lutheran tradition, which has produced much organ music on this well-known chant. And bid the planets and the sun Be thou the shield forevermore In December 2018, the hymn was played at memorial and funeral services for President George H. W. Bush. and Enl.) Protect them where-so-e'er they go; A revision by the author made for the Appendix to the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge Psalms and Hymns, 1869, and repeated in Church Hymns, 1871, No. O Father, hear us when we pray The winds and waves submissive heard, Dive with our men beneath the sea; There is quite a bit of chromaticism throughout, which adds intensity to the mood. Upon the waters dark and rude, Eternal Father, strong to save, Whose arm hath bound the restless wave, Who bidd'st the mighty ocean deep Its own appointed limits keep; Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee, For those in peril on the sea! What a Friend We Have in Jesus 3. The original hymn was penned in 1860 by William Whiting, an Anglican churchman from Winchester, United Kingdom. Grant them from thy great throne above The revised text by the Compilers of Hymns Ancient & Modern, 1861, No. Who bids the mighty ocean deep This hymn is commonly associated with seafarers, particularly in the naval armed services, and is often referred to as the "Navy Hymn." Who didst create the heaven and earth, Lord, hear our prayers for all Seabees, Be Thou My Vision Original text as above, authorized text, Church Hymns, No. O Father, King of earth and sea, "Eternal Father, Strong to Save" is a hymn written by William Whiting in 1860 inspired by the dangers of the sea described in Psalm 107. Eternal vigil while we sleep Lord, guard and guide the men who fly For those in peril on the sea. 4 O Trinity of love and pow'r, Them safe from peril in the deep. O hear us when we cry to Thee Lord God, our power evermore, This hymn also has a long tradition in civilian maritime settings and is regularly called upon by ship's chaplains and sung during services on ocean travels. O Trinity of love and power!Our brethren shield in danger's hour; From rock and tempest, fire and foe, Protect them wheresoe'er they go;Thus evermore shall rise to TheeGlad hymns of praise from land and sea. (comment by Haruo). Whose arm does bind the restless wave, From rock and tempest, fire, and foe, The courage, honor, strength, and skill And watch and guard her from on high! Protect the ones we love at home. This site is a proud member of the Salem Web Network, a subsidiary of Salem Media Group. And bid their angry tumult cease, Holy, Holy, Holy Lord God Almighty Be with them always in the air, And give for wild confusion peace; And comfort loved ones left behind. (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Eternal Father, strong to save,Whose arm hath bound the restless wave, Who bidd'st the mighty ocean deepIts own appointed limits keep;Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee,For those in peril on the sea! God, Who dost still the restless foam, For those in peril on the sea. In faith to thee we humbly pray: Creator, Father, who first breathed But hear from heaven our sailor's cry, And grant eternal life on high! "Eternal Father, Strong to Save" is a hymn written by William Whiting in 1860 inspired by the dangers of the sea described in Psalm 107. FlexScores are available in the Media section below. 321. They saw the works of the Lord, his wonderful deeds in the deep. Naval Academy Glee Club - U.S.S. Jesus Loves Me And all who for their country stand: 4. O hear us when we cry to Thee  2 O Savior, whose almighty word William Whiting wrote this hymn in 1860 in England. And calm amid the rage did sleep; Of all the souls that in her sailed Eternal Father, strong to save, whose arm hath bound the restless wave, who bidd'st the mighty ocean deep its own appointed limits keep: O hear us when we cry to thee for those in peril on the sea. O Christ! Copyright © 2020, GodTube.com. 2 O Savior, whose almighty word This hymn is commonly associated with seafarers, particularly in the naval armed services, and is often referred to as the "Navy Hymn." This version is of the Hymns Ancient & Modern, revised text of 1861, and not of the original manuscript.